ROSS Intelligence Partners With Big Law

Cognitive computing is very close to reality in the legal research realm.

Recently, BakerHostetler, an AMLaw100 firm, released a joint press release with ROSS Intelligence announcing a partnership.

ROSS Intelligence is proud to announce that AmLaw100 law firm BakerHostetler has agreed to retain use of ROSS Intelligence's artificial intelligence legal research product, ROSS.

The ROSS platform is built upon Watson, IBM's cognitive computer. With the support of Watson's cognitive computing and natural language processing capabilities, lawyers ask ROSS their research question in natural language, as they would a person, then ROSS reads through the law, gathers evidence, draws inferences and returns highly relevant, evidence-based candidate answers. ROSS also monitors the law around the clock to notify users of new court decisions that can affect a case. The program continually learns from the lawyers who use it to bring back better results each time.

ROSS Intelligence began out of research at the University of Toronto in 2014 with the goal of building an AI legal research assistant to allow lawyers to enhance and scale their abilities. In June of 2015, after receiving funding from famed Silicon Valley accelerator Y Combinator, ROSS Intelligence relocated from Toronto, Canada to Palo Alto, California. Just ten months after they began teaching ROSS bankruptcy law, the company has been commercializing its first offering. The company is currently in the process of teaching ROSS a variety of other practice areas with the aim that every legal practitioner in the world will have ROSS as a member of their legal team.

To say that people are excited about ROSS is an understatement. There is also a bit of trepidation for what is being touted as a technology that will revolutionize the practice of law - mostly because it seems to be happening so fast.

With law and policy (including professional responsibility rules) often lagging behind the latest, greatest technology, we have our work cut out for us to keep up with ROSS's implications.

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